Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise

Vtg-Herbert-Pino-HP-Sterling-Silver-Ring-Navajo-Indian-Sleeping-Beauty-Turquoise-01-qp
Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise
Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise
Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise
Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise

Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise
VTG HERBERT PINO HP STERLING SILVER RING NAVAJO INDIAN SLEEPING BEAUTY TURQUOISE. We are not experts. We welcome any comments, questions, or concerns. WE ARE TARGETING A GLOBAL MARKET PLACE. Thanks in advance for your patronage. Please Be sure to add WDG to your. NOW FOR YOUR VIEWING PLEASURE. NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN FOLK ART. ORIGINAL ART / OA. ONE OF A KIND / OOAK. SIGNED WITH THE BRAND. BRANDED FOR HERBERT PINO. FROM A LARGE TURQUOISE NUGGET. SUSPECTED TO BE FROM THE SLEEPING BEAUTY MINE IN ARIZONA. RING SIZE IS ABOUT AN 8.5. DEAD PAWN OR TRADING POST. VERY LITTLE IS KNOWN ABOUT THE ARTIST. OTHER THAN HE IS NAVAJO AND RESIDES IN. MAGDALENA, NEW MEXICO (NM). Native American jewelry arises from differing motivations and takes different paths in its development within various Native American tribes. Throughout history various tribes have demonstrated an acute sense for the aesthetic. They visually recorded tribal histories and captured their sense of oneness with nature in ceremonial items, jewelry, clothing, baskets, blankets, and everyday tools and utensils. Traditionally, as Lois Sherr Dubin writes, [i]n the absence of written languages, adornment became an important element of Indian communication, conveying many levels of information. ” Later, jewelry and personal adornment “signaled resistance to assimilation. It remains a major statement of tribal and individual identity. While Native American jewelry can incorporate precious metals and gemstones, beadwork, quillwork, teeth, bones, hide, vegetal fibers, and other materials are used to create jewelry. Contemporary Laguna Pueblo-Chiricahua Apache jeweler Pat Pruitt specializes in steel and other industrial metals in his award-winning art. Meanwhile, contemporary Wampanoag-Eastern Cherokee artist Elizabeth James Perry creates wampum necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and belts on buckskin and milkweed fiber cords. While Native artists continued to incorporate new materials and techniques into their work, jewelry in the Americas has an ancient history. Olivella shell beads, dating from 6000 BCE, were found in Nevada; bone, antler, and possibly marine shell beads from 7000 BCE were found in Russell Cave in Alabama; copper jewelry was traded from Lake Superior beginning in 3000 BCE; and stone beads were carved in Poverty Point in Louisiana in 1500 BCE. Heishe bead necklaces have been discovered in ancient ruins. Remnants of the seashells they used to make beads, were also found. Oyster shell, mother of pearl, abalone, conch and clam have been important trade items in the Southwest for over 1000 years. Native beadwork was already extremely advanced in pre-Columbian era, including utilizing hand ground and filed turquoise, coral, and shell into smooth tiny beads to make heishe necklaces. They made carvings from wood or animal bone to make interesting beads, which they sewed into clothing or stung into necklaces. The Southwest is especially known for its silverwork. Southwest jewelry includes designs of channel inlay, cluster, mosaic, and petite point and materials of shell, gemstones and beads. Whereas the Navajo liked the squash blossom necklace, and they often combined turquoise, coral, and other semi-precious gemstones. They were set into silver scrolls, leaf patterns, and strung on cord for necklaces. The use of silver in Native American jewelry in the Southwest did not become common until the 1850s, when Mexican silversmiths had to trade their silverwork for the cattle from the Navajo. Zuni admired the silver jewelry made by the Navajos, so they began trading livestock for instruction in working silver. By 1890, the Zuni had taught the Hopi how to make silver jewelry. Navajo Navajo people began working with silver in the 19th century. Atsidi Sani, or “Old Smith, ” a blacksmith, is credited as being the first Navajo silversmith. He learned silversmithing from a Mexican friend in the 1850s. Early Navajo silversmiths would use leather dies to make engraved jewelry images, although the Navajo is one of the few Southwestern tribes whose designs do not have symbolic meaning. All the jewelry made in the earliest times was simple, plain silver with no added gemstones, and decorations were made with punches or dies in designs copied from Mexican leather tooling. Navajo silversmiths use sand casting and engraving to produce silver jewelry designs for today’s market, but they actually began sand casting silver around 1875. Silver is melted and then poured into a mold, which is carved from sandstone. When cooled and set, the piece required a great deal of filing and smoothing. Sometimes cast jewelry was also engraved. Turquoise is closely associated with Navajo jewelry, but it was not until 1880 that the first turquoise was set in silver. Excepting for the turquoise wampum from earlier times, turquoise was very scarce and it was to be another thirty years or more before turquoise became readily available. This is why early Navajo jewelry had very few stones. Coral and other semi-precious stones were added to their designs in 1900. They were soldered and surrounded by scrolls, beads and leaf patterns set in sterling silver. Navajo jewelers are known for squash blossom necklaces, which became popular in Navajo jewelry because they incorporated silver beads that looked like blossoms from the squash plant. Sheet copper and copper wire from European-American traders also was made into jewelry. Very few tools are employed and these are simple. The bellows consists of a skin bag about a foot long, held open with wooden hoops. It is provided with a valve and a nozzle. A forge, crucibles, an anvil, and tongs are used during the melting process. Molds, the matrix and die, cold chisels, scissors, pliers, files, awls, and emery paper also come into play. A soldering outfit, consisting of a blowpipe, and a torch made of oil-soaked rags, used with borax, is manipulated successfully by the skillful smith. The silversmith used a grinding stone, sandstone dust, and ashes for polishing the jewelry, and a salt called almogen, was used whitening. The Navajo silversmiths have made buckles, bridles, buttons, rings, round, hollow beads, earrings, crescent shaped pendants, bracelets, crosses, powder chargers, tobacco boxes, and disks used on belts. The Navajo were in close contact with the Mexicans in the 1650s, because they occupied the Southwest at that time. Native Americans in close contact with the Mexicans came to admire the jewelry they wore. The Navajo began to trade their blankets and corn for the jewelry handcrafted by Spanish silversmiths. In 1903, Anthropologist, Uriah Hollister wrote about the Navajo. He said, Belts and necklaces of silver are their pride… They are so skillful and patient in hammering and shaping that a fairly good-shaped teaspoon is often made of a silver dollar without melting and casting. Apache Their tribe is perhaps best known for its amazing variety of jewelry designs. In the late 1800s and early 1900s the Apaches were renowned for mastery in silversmithing which they employed to create unique jewelry designs. Silver was the medium of choice for the Apache when it came to jewelry. They would incorporate the use of some exquisite precious stones such as lapis lazuli and jade to create a colorful piece of jewelry. Apache jewelry designs were usually inspired by past events that held great significance amongst the tribe members. They employed symbols that reminded them of a successful battle, or an important leader. They used turquoise on jewelry as well as on items used in battle. They believed turquoise would make a gun or bow shoot straight, and that a small flake tied to an arrow would bring them favor with the supernatural spirits. Zuni Since pre-contact times, Zuni were known for their stone and shell fetishes, which they traded with other tribes. Fetishes are carved from turquoise, ivory, amber, shell, or onyx. Today, Zuni bird fetishes are often set with heishe beads in multi-strand necklaces. Lanyade became the first Zuni silversmith in 1872. Kineshde, a Zuni smith of the late 1890s, is credited for first combining silver and turquoise into his jewelry designs. Zuni jewelers soon became known for their clusterwork. In 1854 Captain Sitgreave illustrated a Zuni forge, which was still useful in the early part of the 20th century. The forge was made of adobe and had a bellows made of two skin bags. The large silver objects were often cast in sandstone molds and then ornamented by tooling but not by engraving. Scissors and shears were used for cutting thin pieces of silver into artifacts. Santo Domingo Pueblo Santo Domingo Pueblo, located on the Rio Grande has made bead jewelry from shells and turquoise, jet, and coral gemstones for many centuries. Sterling silver has also been added in contemporary jewelry designs. Santo Domingo is known for its bead necklaces called “heishe, ” which comes from the Santo Domingo word for shell. Heishi is a rolled bead of shell, turquoise or coral, which is cut very thin. Shells used for heishi included mother-of-pearl, spiny oyster, abalone, coral, conch and clam. Tiny, thin heishi was strung together by the Santo Domingo to create beautiful necklaces. These shells and necklaces were important trade items of the southwest for more than thousand years. Another style of necklace made by the Santo Domingo consisted of tear-shaped, flat “tabs” strung on heishi shell or turquoise beads. The tabs were made from bone inset with a design in the traditional mosaic style using bits of turquoise, jet, and shell. These beautiful, colorful necklaces are also sometimes identified as Depression jewelry, but they were certainly made earlier than that, and are still made today. Gail Bird is a contemporary Santo Domingo jeweler, known for her collaborations with Navajo jeweler Yazzie Johnson and their themed concha belts. Hopi Sikyatata became the first Hopi silversmith in 1898. Hopi Indian silversmiths today are known for their overlay technique used in silver jewelry designs, however, their use of silver was slow to develop. The scarcity of silver kept the primary jewelry components used by the Hopi to shell and stone until the 1930′ and 1940’s, and very few Hopi knew how to work silver. This changed in 1946, when Dr. Williard Beatty, Director for Indian Service, visited an exhibit of Hopi arts and crafts. The artistic beauty he saw caused him to develop a program to teach silversmithing to Hopi veterans of World War II. They learned intricate cutting, grinding and polishing was mastered by these students, as well as die-stamping and sand casting of beautiful stylized Hopi designs. The students taught fellow tribesmen the skills to excel in crafting silver jewelry, which they used to stylize traditional designs from the decorative patterns of old pottery and baskets. These early silversmithing students were encouraged by curators from the Museum of Northern Arizona to develop their own style, separate from the Zuni and Navajo. One of the most creative of these students was Victor Coochwytewa. Some credit him with helping to develop a new technique called overlay, along with Paul Saufkie and Fred Kabotie. The Hopi Silvercraft Cooperative Guild was organized by these early students. Overlay involves two layers of silver sheets. One sheet has the design etched into it, and then it is soldered onto the second sheet with cut out designs. The background is made darker through oxidation, and the top layer is polished, where the bottom layer of silver is allowed to oxidized. The top un-oxidized top layer is made into a cutout design which allows the dark bottom layer to show through. This technique is still in use today in very expensive silver jewelry. The overlay technique was further refined and developed in the late 1940s by Paul Saufkie and Fred Kabotie at the Museum of Northern Arizona, and Paul’s son Lawrence continued making silver overlay jewelry for over 60 years. Hopi jeweler Charles Loloma (19211991)transformed mid-20th century Native American jewelry by winning major awards with his innovative jewelry incorporating new materials and techniques. Loloma was the first to use gold, and to inlay mulitple stones within a piece of jewelry, which completely changed and beautified the look of Hopi jewelry. (STOCK PICTURE FOR DISPLAY ONLY). DO NOT BE TOO PERSNICKETY. Please leave feedback when you have received the item and are satisfied. Our goal is for 5-star service. We want you to be a satisfied, return customer. Please express any concerns or questions. More pictures are available upon request. Thanks for perusing THIS and ALL our auctions. Please Check out our other items. WE like the curious and odd. Track Page Views With. Auctiva’s FREE Counter. The item “VTG HERBERT PINO HP STERLING SILVER RING NAVAJO INDIAN SLEEPING BEAUTY TURQUOISE” is in sale since Sunday, June 17, 2018. This item is in the category “Jewelry & Watches\Ethnic, Regional & Tribal\Native American\Rings”. The seller is “cbenhob” and is located in Jenks, Oklahoma. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Country of Manufacture: United States
  • Country of Origin: AMERICAN SOUTHWEST
  • Signed?: Signed
  • Main Stone: Turquoise
  • Metal: Sterling Silver
  • Jewelry Type: Rings
  • Ring Size: 8.5

Vtg Herbert Pino HP Sterling Silver Ring Navajo Indian Sleeping Beauty Turquoise